Motions of no confidence in the Cupertino Alliance

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There has been various motions of no confidence within the Cupertino Alliance. They are used to determine if the Cupertino Parliament has trust within an employee, tests if the Government is able to command confidence within Parliament, and is a check and balance towards both the executive and judicial branches.

History

Before the Charter Act, 2020, there was no formal way for Parliament to sack the Chair or Government. This being said, Lycon himself self-inflicted a motion of confidence vote following the mishandling of the 69 Hour Session.

Following the passage of Charter Act, 2020, there were two ways to terminate the Government,

  • Impeachment, instigated under Chapter 12 of the Charter, only applies to the Superior and Associate Judges. Impeachment requires a trial administered by the Superior Court.
  • Motions of no confidence, modelled under the British Westminster system, applies to the Chair and ministerial positions, requires Parliament to achieve a 70%+ aye vote to pass. It is codified under Article 30 of the Charter Act.

The impeachment process was vague and complicated and thus was repealed with the passage of the Judicial Confidence Amendment. This amendment abolished the act of impeachment and replaced any other impeachable positions with motions of confidence. There were no cases of impeachment.

Motion of no confidence against the Government, 4 April 2020

A motion of no confidence was called on 4 April 2020 by then-Chair Jayden Lycon against his government. This was announced on 23 March 2020 an apology written by Lycon for the Government's mishandling of the 69 Hour Session. [1] The motion was defeated 8-1, [2] and the first Lycon government continued governing until the 1st Cupertino Alliance chairmanship election.

4 April 2020
Vote of no confidence in the Lycon government

Motion proposed by Chair Jayden Lycon (Aenderia's 1st)
Division
Aye
1 / 9
☒N No
8 / 9

Proposed motion of no confidence against the Superior Judge, 15 November 2020

On 15 November 2020, Leon Montan filed for a motion of no confidence against then-Superior Judge Zarel Smith for being anti-Semitic. When asked for evidence for the claim, Montan gave various statements by Smith regarding stereotypes of Jews, with delegates such as Alexander I Constatine supporting the motion. Jamez, a Jew, said that Smith was genuinely sorry to those comments and urged Parliament to forgive him. Montan later posted another piece of evidence regarding the motion, which included Smith replying to a discussion between Montan and Terry of Essexia. The discussion involved Montan accusing Smith of being anti-Semitic when Smith later rebutted with him not posting about animal abuse.

Delegates were confused on how that was linked towards anti-Semitism, with Montan giving the statement:

The material that is in question I believe was fake, but if it is real, I will apologize for it. It was a shock video of an extremely large pig doing questionable activities, and due to the sheer size of the pig, I did not believe it was real.

— Leon Montan, 2020

This was panned by delegates, notably Jamez, who accused Montan of trolling and creating a double standard against Smith.

Motion of no confidence against the Superior Judge, 16 January 2021

On 4 January 2021, the Chair of the Board dismissed Nicholas Fisher per advice from then-Superior Judge Jamez, citing Article 9 of the Charter Act. [3] A week later, Fisher noticed that he was banned from the Cupertino Alliance server, and after asking regarding the change, inquired Cameron Koehler on legal advice. Koehler rebutted on 13 January 2021, citing the 123rd Article of the Charter

4 April 2020
Vote of no confidence in the Superior Judge

Motion proposed by delegate Cameron Koehler (Australis' 3rd)
Division
YesY Aye
14 / 24
No
4 / 24
Abstain
6 / 24

Proposed motion of no confidence against the Government, April 2021

Motion of no confidence against the Minister of Membership Attainment, August 2021

On 2 August 2021, Daniel Hamilton led a Motion of No Confidence against Leon Montan, who was the incumbent Minister of Membership Attainment, citing the fact that Montan had become inactive and had not performed his duties to the best of his ability. The motion was successful, resulting in Montan being removed from office on 3 August 2021. Shortly afterwards, Hamilton succeeded Montan as Minister.

2 August 2021
Motion of No Confidence in the Minister of Membership Attainment

Motion proposed by delegate Daniel Hamilton (Australis' 1st)
Division
YesY Aye
19 / 26
No
3 / 26
Abstain
4 / 26

Planned motion of no confidence against the Chairman, November 2021

During early November 2021, a Motion of No Confidence against then Chairman Dhrubajyoti Roy was to be tabled. However, prior to it being officially presented, Roy was tipped off about the motion's existence. Shortly thereafter, he released a statement resigning as Chair and naming Lieutenant Chair Tyler Mullins as his successor and interim Chair of the Board.

The reasons for the motion were due to somewhat suspicious actions taken by Roy, including vocal opposition to the expulsion of Huai Siao, from which arose accusations of corruption, and the naming of Thorin Neal as Minister of American Affairs. Neal was to be appointed due to his lack of criticism of the administration, although he did criticize the Chair on occasions before that. Other actions included unfulfillment of campaign promises, among others.

The motion was backed by many significant members of the Alliance, including the two previous Chairmen, Jayden Lycon and Logan Ross, the incumbent Superior Judge Carson Snyder, ministers including Sertor Valentinus, Thorin Neal, Larry Martin and Daniel Hamilton, and other former CA ministers including Brennan Sullivan, Leon Montan and Liam Alexander.

References

  1. Lycon, Jayden (23 March 2020) Apology issued effective 23 March 2020
  2. Lycon, Jayden (9 April 2020) Cupertino Gazette Issue 10
  3. Lycon, Jayden (4 January 2021) Article 9 Suspension issued 4 January 2021