Burklandi English

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Burklandi English language
Flag of Burkland.png Burkland
Spoken in Flag of Burkland.png Burkland
Total speakers est. 1-3
Family Indo-European
  • Germanic
    • West Germanic
      • Anglo-Frisian
        • Anglic
          • English
            • Burklandi English
Type English dialect
Regulated by Burklandi State Language Authority

The Burklandi English language is a term to refer to the mix of British and American English as spoken in Burkland, mainly by Matthew Burklandssen. As opposed to most other micronational languages Burklandi English cannot really be called constructed as this dialect evolved naturally from American English and British English. The British English influence came from the British micronational community and growing anti-Americanism.

Features

Features of Burklandi English is a term used to describe spelling and grammar rules in Burklandi English. Some are based in American English, some are based in British English and some are unique to Burklandi English.

  • British spelling is used in cases such as "color" and "colour" and "er" and "re"
  • "Undergeneralization" in Burklandi English refers to tendency to reject generalization if the speaker isn't sure if the fact should be generalized or not.
  • Burklandi English uses "ize" and derivatives instead of "ise" and their derivatives.
  • Even if the organization officially has one member, organizations are often use the pronoun "we" or "they."
  • Capitalization is mainly used for the beginning of sentences, proper nouns or adjective forms of proper nouns (such as Italian or Hindu)
  • Names of ideologies and their adjective forms are often not capitalized unless they begin with a "na" or if it is named after a person. Another notable expection is the word Juche being capitalized.

Slynyfycation

Slynyfycation is a term used to describe the rising use of Burklandi Slin-Englysh, a dialect of Burklandi English that changes "i"s to "y"s expect if they are in a group of vowels or they are at the beginning or end of a word.