Angle-Saxish Kingdom

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Angle-Saxish Kingdom
Angelsaxisch Küneraiçh

Saxonflag.pngAngle-saxish coa.png

Motto
"Post tenebras lux" (Latin)
"Light after darkness"
Anthem
"Le Psaume des Batailles"

Capital city Langhoom
Official language(s) Angle-Saxish
Official religion(s) Church of Angle-Saxons
Demonym Angle-Saxish
Government Parliamentary constitutional monarchy
- Monarch Johannes
- Chancellor Christianus Niuwtaun
Legislature Councillors' Assembly
People's Assembly
- Type - Bicameral
- Number of seats - 3
- Last election - 12 December 2017
Established 10 June 2010
Currency Angle-Saxish moneyers' pound (£)
Time zone UTC+0 to UTC+1

Official Website

The Angle-Saxish Kingdom (Angle-Saxish: Angelsaxisch Küneraiçh) is a constitutional monarchy comprising territories in the British Isles and North America.

Etymology

The empire is named after both the confederated Anglo-Saxon tribes (Angles, Jutes and Saxons) which colonized England and the Saxons who inhabited northern Germany.

History

The five nations

Evidence of an explicitly Anglo-Saxon national identity can be found at least as early as AD 924, with Athelstan styling himself King of the Anglo-Saxons. As a confederated group in Britain, however, they can be traced back to AD 449, when the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle recounts, "Then came the men from three powers of Germany: the Old Saxons, the Angles, and the Jutes." They came at the invitation of the British King Vortigern to aid in the war against the Picts following his failure to secure succour from a collapsing Roman Empire. Nevertheless, by the 6th century, this had ended in the Anglo-Saxon conquest of a large part of Britain, which was now an island of five nations: English, Welsh, Scottish, Pictish, and Latin.

Heptarchy

"From the Jutes are descended the men of Kent, the Wightwarians (that is, the tribe that now dwelleth in the Isle of Wight), and that kindred in Wessex that men yet call the kindred of the Jutes. From the Old Saxons came the people of Essex and Sussex and Wessex. From Anglia, which has ever since remained waste between the Jutes and the Saxons, came the East Angles, the Middle Angles, the Mercians, and all of those north of the Humber."

Of all the petty realms of England, a heptarchy (that is, a government of seven kingdoms) prevailed. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle lists a chronology of early Bretwaldas, those kings who were the overlords of the British kingdoms. Ælla of Sussex (488-514) is the first of these and Oswiu of Northumbria (642-70) the last. ​ At the Battle of Maserfield on 5 August 642, King Penda, with his Mercian and Welsh forces, defeated the Northumbrians under King Oswald. Following the battle, Penda established Mercian supremacy in Britain for a number of generations.

Of all the petty realms of England, a heptarchy (that is, a government of seven kingdoms) prevailed. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle lists a chronology of early Bretwaldas, those kings who were the overlords of the British kingdoms. Ælla of Sussex (488-514) is the first of these and Oswiu of Northumbria (642-70) the last. At the Battle of Maserfield on 5 August 642, King Penda, with his Mercian and Welsh forces, defeated the Northumbrians under King Oswald. Following the battle, Penda established Mercian supremacy in Britain for a number of generations.

An Anglo-Scandinavian Empire

King Beornwulf was defeated in Ellandun by King Egbert of Wessex. The other sub-kings switched their allegiance to the victor, ending the long period of Mercian supremacy. England, at times under immense pressure, eventually managed to resist the persistent raids by heathens from Scandinavia. It was this West Saxon line, bringing forth Alfred the Great, which would liberate and unify the Kingdom of England. England was furthermore united with Denmark for a short period during the reign of Danish King Sweyn Forkbeard and again, along with Norway and Sweden, after the House of Denmark (under Cnut the Great) was restored following the Battle of Assandun.

The Anglo-Norman age

After King Edward died in 1066, Earl Harold of Essex (his brother-in-law) was elected by the English Assembly (Witenagemót) as his successor. This was contested by William of Normandy, claiming that the crown had already been promised to him by Edward. Another pretender to the throne, Harald Hardrada of Norway, invaded the north and was defeated by Harold’s forces at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. Mere days later, they were again forced to fight at Hastings, but were finally overcome by the Normans. ​Notwithstanding, by the time of the Conquest there was already a well established Anglo-Saxon civilization, including a rich literary tradition in the vulgar language which was virtually unique in Europe, thanks to an extensive education policy promoted by King Alfred which had made England a centre of scholarship in history, religion, and philosophy.