Ceylensis

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Ceylensis
Ceylenflag.pngCeylenseal.jpg

Motto
"Liberté, Unité, Fraternité
Europe
Capital city Ville de Saint-Pierre
Largest city Ville de Saint-Pierre
Official language(s) French, English
Official religion(s) Catholic Christianity
Demonym Ceylensian
Government Constitutional Monarchy
- Chancellor Celese Trevelyan
- Queen Queen Zoya
Legislature State Rada
- Type - Unicameral
Time zone (UTC)
Patron saint St. Peter

Ceylensis is a micronation located in Europe, which was founded in September 2010. It is a Pan-European micronation, but is mostly concentrated in Western Europe. It is a relatively young micronation, having only come online in the first half of 2011. It has grown steadily since its inception and is now a functioning, if small, society.

The official languages of Ceylensis are French and English, which was decreed by Queen Zoya in October 2010. The nation is a constitutional monarchy, with the majority of state power being vested in the State Rada, or Parliament. Queen Zoya was elected upon the creation of Ceylensis and has reigned since.

Etymology

'Ceylensis' is pronounced as though it was said in French, i.e.: "Say-Lon-See". In everyday spoken Ceylensis French, it is pronounced without the last syllable: "Say-Lons"

History

Ceylensis was founded on September 2nd 2010, as a social project for those in the area who were interested in politics. French and English were chosen as the official languages due to the fact that they are two of the principal working languages of the United Nations. It was one of the earliest decisions of the Ceylensis Government not to attach a moniker such as "Kingdom of" to the name, preferring to maintain the nation's identity free of its Government make-up.

Government

Ceylensis is a Constitutional Monarchy in which the Queen occupies the role of Head of State. Legislative power is concentrated in the State Rada, which is the Parliament. All major decisions have to be debated in the Rada before being made, and in the case of a tie, the Queen can exercise her constitutional right to cast the tie-breaking vote.