Classification of micronations

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Micronations may be classified using many different systems, and many micronations have their own private systems to distinguish between micronations.

Billbrough-Miles Micronational Ranking System

Focusing on influence, the system ranks Micronations based on their influence in their respective communities, and in the Micronational community as a whole, with 1 being the highest and 8 being the lowest:

1.) Serious nations that have a slim chance of statehood, or are semi recognised, these include: Principality of Sealand, Molossia and Hutt River.

2.) Semi serious nations, that whilst have the chance to reach the same as level one nations, would need more time and effort in place to achieve this. These are highly respected nations such as Austenasia, who usually lead discussion within the community.

3.) Also semi serious nations, but without the age, respect or organisation of the level 2 nations. These nations are still well respected and with time could achieve level 2, these include Ashukovo, Sorrenia, Sirocco etc. These are respected by the majority of Micronationalists, like level’s 1 and 2, and will often have the support of several other large Micronations. Similarly, these nations are usually at the forefront of the community.

4.) Similar to level 3 nations, but again, with less age, respect or influence. These include nations such as Zirconic. These have high influence only within their communities, and not on the general Micronational scale.

5.) Nations that have some respect, but do not have the same influence as level 4 nations. These are largely new, or were inactive for a large while. This includes nations such as Abelden

6.) These nations are largely inactive or not respected or influential.

7.) These are nations that are newly made within Micronationalism, and as such are known to a small few.

8.) These are nations that are hugely inactive or descended into some kind of joke or disgrace as most macronations view micronations. These include Catan, Milinton, etc.

The ranking is decided by Miles of Sorrenia or Damian Billbrough, rather than the micronation themselves, as the ranking system is based on opinion, rather than fact, therefore could lead to bias.

Boodlesmythe-Tallini System of Classification

Quantitative Classification (Boodlesmythe)

  • “Online” versus “Bricks and Mortar” — an “Online” micronation exists solely in the server space it occupies; whereas a “Bricks and Mortar” micronation might have an online presence, but would continue to exist if the server hosting their space ceased to exist.
  • “Tiny” versus “Small” versus “Sizeable” — a “Tiny” micronation would have from 1-10 members/citizens; a “Small” micronation would have from 11-50 members/citizens; and a “Sizeable” micronation would have 51 or more members/citizens.
  • “Community” versus “Statehood” — a “Community” micronation exists as a group of people with a shared set of goals or aims; whereas a “Statehood” micronation seeks to form a functional government and acquire sovereign territory.

Qualitative Classification (Tallini)

  • 7th World — Under the best of circumstances: a flaky micronation. Under the worst: a total joke.
  • 6th World — Under the best of circumstances: a serious micronation with potential, but it will need an attractive culture to florish. Under the worst: a sizeable community, more than a nation.
  • 5th World — Under the best of circumstances: serious competition for Sealand. Under the worst: a small community with great potential if it develops an attractive culture, and a committed few.

Whole Picture (Boodlesmythe-Tallini)

  1. Online, Tiny, Community — 7th World
  2. Online, Tiny, Statehood — 7th World
  3. Online, Small, Community — 7th World
  4. Online, Small, Statehood — 7th World
  5. Online, Sizeable, Community — 6th World
  6. Online, Sizeable, Statehood — 6th World
  7. Bricks and Mortar, Tiny, Community — 6th World
  8. Bricks and Mortar, Tiny, Statehood — 6th World
  9. Bricks and Mortar, Small, Community — 5th World
  10. Bricks and Mortar, Small, Statehood — 5th World
  11. Bricks and Mortar, Sizeable, Community — 5th World
  12. Bricks and Mortar, Sizeable, Statehood — 5th World

Dan's System of Classification

Introduced by the king of Danland, to classify nations of all types.

  • 1st World: Developed macronation
  • 2nd World: Developing macronation
  • 3rd World: Limited-recognised macronation
  • 4th World: Micronation that is a serious competition with Sealand. A major micronation.
  • 5th World: A serious micronation with potential, but it will need an attractive culture to florish.
  • 6th World: A flaky micronation.
  • 7th World: Imaginary country or Micra
  • 8th World: Fictional country

David's Micronational Potential Index

The Micronational Potential Index (MPI) was created by David Salapa in order to rank and evaluate the micronations which are 6 months or less and would most likely have a very low score on the Dresner System of Classification. The system takes on a light-hearted and optimistic walk-through-style attitude and has some messages of encouragement for those with scores of 0 on one or more grades. The scoring is as follows:

I. Population (Excluding website members)

  • 0. Micronation is online. But that could change.
  • 1. Yourself.
  • 2. 2 to 5 people.
  • 3. 6 to 10 people.
  • 4. 11 to 15 people.
  • 5. 16 and up.

II. Website activeness

  • 0. Micronation has no website...yet. But keep an eye on it!
  • 1. One forum post or comment every 2 weeks.
  • 2. One forum post or comment every 10 days.
  • 3. One forum post or comment every 7 days.
  • 4. One forum post or comment every 4 days.
  • 5. One forum post or comment every 36 hours.

III. Diplomacy

  • 0. Micronation has no allies. It just needs to work itself out first.
  • 1. 1 or 2 allies.
  • 2. 3 or 4 allies.
  • 3. 5 or 6 allies.
  • 4. 7 or 8 allies.
  • 5. 9 allies and up.

IV. Sphere of Influence (M-D equals Mark-Dresner equivalent on their same category)

  • 0. Relatively unknown outside of the creator's immediate vicinity. That's bound to change.
  • 1. Not known outside an extremely limited area online.
  • 2. Somewhat unknown or widely ignored. (M-D 1)
  • 3. Known by some micronations, but not really popular. (M-D 1.5)
  • 4. Known inside the micronational community but not seen as the most successful or popular micronation. (M-D 2)
  • 5. Known by people and throughout the micronational Internet. (M-D 2.5)

V. Basic Information

  • 0. Has a name only. That's a start, though!
  • 1. Has a flag.
  • 2. Has a flag and anthem.
  • 3. Has both of those, a coat of arms, and a motto.
  • 4. Has all four of those and a national language and religion.
  • 5. Has all six of those and another informational category, such as a patron saint or national sport.

Grading

  • 0-0.9: You've just started, right? That's okay. The points won't all come in one day. Give it time and effort and you will rise.
  • 1-1.9: If your micronation is 1 month old, you're right on track. Keep going!
  • 2-2.9: Your micronation should be around 2.5 months old. You are doing an excellent job so far and hopefully you haven't lost interest in your country. Press on!
  • 3-3.9: Your micronation should be around 4 months old and if it is it has developed quite a lot. Eventually you'll be ready to move on.
  • 4-4.9: Is your micronation 5 or 5.5 months old? If so you're almost ready to move on! It's okay if you don't make the final grade, you'll still be able to proceed.
  • 5.0: Congratulations! You are now fully prepared to move on. Once you get here or reach 6 months old, you should stop using this system and move on to the much harsher Mark-Dresner System. Good luck!

Example

Below is a historical comparison of the Republic of Ultamiya against the MPI. Measurements are made in 1-month increments.

March 27th, 2010 (Founding): 2/0/0/1/4 (1.4)

April 27th, 2010: 4/4/0/2/4 (2.8)

May 27th, 2010: 4/3/1/2/4 (2.8)

June 27th, 2010: 5/2/4/4/5 (4.0)

July 27th, 2010: 5/2/5/4/5 (4.2)

August 27th, 2010: 5/2/5/5/5 (4.4)

September 27th, 2010: 5/2/5/5/5 (4.4)

Dresner's System of Classification

Dresner's System of Classification, also known as the "Categoric-Gradial System of Classification", is another way of classifying the potential and importance of micronations. As its alternate name says, it works with Categories and Gradients, exactly five of each. A specialty of this classification is that it automatically classifies all online micronations as "0".

The scale is fairly simple. The scale is from one to five, one being the worst class, and five being the best class. The categories, combined with the various scales are as follows:

  • Population
    • 1: 5 or less
    • 2: 15 or less
    • 3: 30 or less
    • 4: 50 or less
    • 5: 51 or more
  • Cultural development
    • 1: Hardly any culture in existance. (eg. very scant information, often no flag)
    • 2: Basic insignia in existance. (eg. flag, coat of arms, little detailed information)
    • 3: Some culture in existance (eg. a cuisine or national dish)
    • 4: A basic culture in existance (eg. a cuisine and a religion)
    • 5: A strong culture in existance (many aspects covered, eg. cuisine, religion, language, sport etc.)
  • Allies (this includes nations with mutual recognition)
    • 1: 2 allies or less
    • 2: 5 allies or less
    • 3: 10 allies or less
    • 4: 20 allies or less
    • 5: 21 allies upwards
  • Sphere of influence
    • 1: Micronation is widely ignored.
    • 2: Micronation is known and watched, but in no position to eg. threaten somebody. The highest honour available in the micronation would be nothing special for a foreigner.
    • 3: Micronation relatively well-known and its actions are followed by many. Should they threaten someone, it is not ignored but doesn't cause too great fear either, and the highest honour would be an honour, but is certainly outmatchable by honours from elsewhere.
    • 4: Micronation is well-known, its actions are quite important. A threat made by them is taken very seriously, and their highest honour is probably a very special honour for the recipient, which they will be quite thankful for.
    • 5: Micronation is widely known among micronationalists and outsiders alike. A threat would cause great fear among a micronation and its allies. Also, even one of the smaller honours of such a micronation would be regarded as an incredible honour by any recipient.
  • Budget
    • 1: Less than $50 spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes internet connection and web hosting costs.
    • 2: Less than $100 spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes internet connection and web hosting costs.
    • 3: Less than $150 spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes internet connection and web hosting costs.
    • 4: Less than $200 spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes internet connection and web hosting costs.
    • 5: More than $200 spent yearly on the micronation in question. This may or may not include internet connection and web hosting costs.

Level calculation

Finally, once all these are determined, one calculates the level of a specific micronation by taking the average of all the scores. If a factor is unknown, a guess can be made or it may be left out. Here is an example:

  • Petorio: 2/3/4/4/1 = 2+3+4+4+1 = 14; 14/5 = 2.8

Thus, Petorio's level would be 2.8. Here is what the levels mean:

  • 1-1.4: This... ...whatever it is does not deserve the term "micronation".
  • 1.5-1.9: Not a micronation worth mentioning, will probably fall apart very soon.
  • 2.0-2.9: If it is a very young micronation, it may yet prosper; if it is older (four months upwards), it is relatively insignificant, but not necessarily to be ignored. Many older ones are in a temporary period of inactivity, but may ascend to a level 3.0-3.9 micronation eventually.
  • 3.0-3.9: A very average micronation, they exist en masse. No need to ignore them, but they probably aren't very special or interesting. Often it is hard to tell the difference between them, and if they stay at this level for a long time it is probably because of a lack of population, time, effort, and/or interest.
  • 4.0-4.9: One of the most significant micronations (eg. St. Charlie, The Soviet Republic of North America, etc). There was a lot of effort involved in getting the micronation to this level. Once here, it is quite difficult for the nation to fall back down unless it becomes inactive, like Scientopia.
  • 5.0: What some describe as a micronational superpower; this would be something like Sealand, Molossia, etc., although the mentioned two are in a process of becoming less and less active. Thus, they may have to be reclassified soon.

Economic Potential Index

About

In order to assist with the potential creation of trade-agreements between micronations, Miles Bradley Huff devised the following rating system on 2010's October 3 and revised it in the days following that date. This system was designed to give micronations a quick overview of another nation's economy or economic potential before opening trade-negotiations with it. It was overhauled in 2013's June, and renamed from "Miles's System of Economic Classification". It was later tweaked again, if only slightly, in 2014's October and 2016's March.
The scale is fairly simple, and works similarly to the Dresner-System of Classification. It mostly operates on a scale from zero to five. There are several categories and subcategories, and each should be filled out appropriately. A weighted average of each category's score is taken at the end. This provides the EPI, or Economic Potential Index, of the micronation in question. The system is outlined below:

Criteria

1. Gross Domestic Product
To calculate your micronation's GDP, use the following formula: Y=C+I+(X-M)+G, with Y=GDP, C=Consumer Spending, I=Investment made by industry, X=Total Value of Exports, M=Total Value of Imports, and G=Government Spending. Use intl$ for the GDP. [1]
This value may be left out if the GDP is uncalculatable.
  • -5: Lower than -$200
  • -4: -$200 or higher
  • -3: -$150 or higher
  • -2: -$100 or higher
  • -1: -$50 or higher
  • 0: No GDP
  • 1: $50 or lower
  • 2: $100 or lower
  • 3: $150 or lower
  • 4: $200 or lower
  • 5: Higher than $200
*Give this category 2x weight in your average.
2. Type of economy
Halve this value if one or more gender-roles is occupationally, educationally, or otherwise oppressed. Also, this value does not count unless the Gross Domestic Product score is 3 or higher
  • 0: No market
  • 1: Agrarian
  • 2: Agrarian-Industrial
  • 3: Industrial
  • 4: Industrial-Consumerist
  • 5: Consumerist
3. Human resources
This is the number of citizens with the ability and time to work within the micronation in question. Naturally, those outside the labour pool should not be counted for this section.
Note that this section is weighted 2x if its value is 3 or lower.
  • 0: One or less
  • 1: Four or less
  • 2: Eight or less
  • 3: Sixteen or less
  • 4: Twenty-four or less
  • 5: Thirty-six or more
4. Unemployment rate
Also, this value does not count unless the Human resources score is 1 or higher.
  • -1: More than 95% of total labour pool is unemployed
  • 0: Between 80% and 95% of labour pool is unemployed
  • 1: Between 60% and 80% of labour pool is unemployed
  • 2: Between 40% and 60% of labour pool is unemployed
  • 3: Between 20% and 40% of labour pool is unemployed
  • 4: Between 5% and 20% of labour pool is unemployed
  • 5: Less than 5% of total population is unemployed
5. Size of the middle-class
This section includes citizens outside of the labour pool. Also, this value does not count unless the Human resources score is 4 or higher.
  • -1: Less than 5% of total population is middle-class
  • 0: Between 5% and 20% of total population is middle-class
  • 1: Between 20% and 40% of total population is middle-class
  • 2: Between 40% and 60% of total population is middle-class
  • 3: Between 60% and 80% of total population is middle-class
  • 4: Between 80% and 95% of total population is middle-class
  • 5: More than 95% of total population is middle-class
6. Natural & capital resources
This section counts things such as lumber, wool, and iron, among others. The micronation in question must have a means by which to extract/process these resources in order for them to count. For example, a micronation which sits on a gold-mine but which hasn't the capability to mine that gold should not count gold for this section. Similarly, a micronation which has sewing facilities but no thread should not count their sewing machine.
It should also be noted that land itself does not count for this section, as it is a prerequisite for statehood under the Montevideo Convention, which makes it a null-point in comparing most micronations. In the event of a micronation with no claimed land, subtract one from this section. Also, if the micronation in question has land but does not have the ability to produce food, subtract 1 from this section's score.
  • 0: No usable resources
  • 1: One usable resource
  • 2: Two usable resources
  • 3: Three usable resources
  • 4: Four usable resources
  • 5: Six or more usable resources
*Give this category 2x weight in your average.
7. Means of Distribution
This refers to the means of distribution that are available to your micronation. If your macronation has Land, Train, Sea, and Air, you don't unless your micronation owns trucks, railroads, ships, and planes. If all of your micronation's means of distribution are through another country's means of distribution, then you should check "Internet/Virtual", unless you are unable to use the Internet. If you have a 0 for your Natural & capital resources score, don't count this category.
  • 0: No means of distribution
  • 1: Internet/Virtual
  • 2: One means of distribution
  • 3: Two means of distribution
  • 4: Three means of distribution
  • 5: Four or more means of distribution

Level calculation

These factors are all then added-up together and divided by nine. This value is then rounded to the nearest tenth place; or if negative, set to 0. The resultant number is that particular micronation's EPI (Economic Potential Index). For example, by this system, the Kingdom of Theodia's EPI would have been 1.3 (1|~|1|1|~|2|~) in 2013's June. Here are some short descriptions of what different EPI's indicate:

  • 0: This micronation hasn't got much of any sort of an economy.
  • 1: This micronation has serious potential for a very basic economy.
  • 2: This micronation has serious potential for a basic economy.
  • 3: This micronation has serious potential for a small economy.
  • 4: This micronation has serious potential for a decent economy.
  • 5: This micronation has serious potential for a strong economy.

Freayth's System of Classification

Freayth's System of Classification is the revised version of Freayth's previous classification system. The new classification system was invented in 12 April 2017 which now conforms to the current view of success in the micronational community. Only the Freedoms and Influence within the community categories are to be done by Freayth personally with consultation and the rest may be done by their respective micronations. The system classifies a micronation under a year and is ranked from 1-3.

Politics

  • 1 - Government is inactive to somewhat active; Legislation passed is less than 3 under a year and elections/appointments being held only under 1 ½ year.
  • 2 - Government is moderately active; Legislation passed is at least 5-8 times under a year and elections/appointments being done under a year/10 months or every 6 months.
  • 3 - Government is very active; Legislation passed is more than 9 times in a year and elections/appointments are done quarterly.

Development

  • 1 - Has none to basic resource such as a fairly modern computer, a website, social media accounts, e-mail and etc.
  • 2 - Has slightly more advanced features like a currency, monuments, forum (optionally) and a newspaper or digital news.
  • 3 - Has excellent amenities like the above, but with some slight transport; a well designed and richly written website, production oriented business and primary industry.

Budget

  • 1 - Less than USD $25 or none in a year
  • 2 - Less than USD $125 in a year
  • 3 - More than USD $250 in a year or more

Cultural and nationalistic development

  • 1 - Little to basic devices and insignias present such as flags, CoAs, detailed information and little cultural development like a national drink/dish.
  • 2 - Some to basic cultural presence such as an established religion, a cuisine, holidays and observances, sports and etc.
  • 3 - Strong cultural presence such as a well established religion and language, sports, a well implemented observance of holidays and traditions in a micronation.

Freedoms

  • 1 - Has some to moderate freedoms.
  • 2 - Has moderate freedoms.
  • 3 - Has absolute freedoms.

Influence within the community

  • 1 - Has barely to some influence within the community.
  • 2 - Has moderately to agreeable influence within the community.
  • 3 - Has a large influence within the community.

Grading system

All scores are added then divided by 3 to get the level.

E.g. Abeldane Empire = 3/2/1/2/3/2 = 11 = 11/3 = 3.6

  • 1 - 2.5 - A young or developing micronation.
  • 2.6 - 3.9 - An average or somewhat advanced micronation.
  • 4 - 5.8 - An influential and advanced micronation.
  • 5.8 - 6 - A somewhat ‘superpower’ micronation like Molossia, Sealand and etc.

Linden's Revised System of Classification

Linden's Revised System of Classification, also known as the "Categoric-Gradial System of Classification", is another way of classifying the potential and importance of micronations. It was revised by its creator on December 27, 2011, to more accurately adapt to the changes in the view of "success" in micronational terms that had occurred since the original conception of the system. As its alternate name says, it works with Categories and Gradients, exactly five of each. A specialty of this classification is that it automatically classifies all micronations whose main claims are not on Earth as "0".

The scale is fairly simple. The scale is from one to five, one being the worst class, and five being the best class. The categories, combined with the various scales are as follows:

  • Politics
    • 0: Completely inactive government.
    • 1: Government is barely active, no more than a maximum of 3 laws passed per year.
    • 2: Government is slightly active, no more than a maximum of 5 laws passed per year.
    • 3: Government is somewhat active, a minimum of 5 laws passed per year.
    • 4: Government is active, a minimum of 8 laws passed per year.
    • 5: Government is very active, a minimum of 13 laws passed per year.
  • Cultural development
    • 0: No unique culture in existence.
    • 1: Hardly any culture in existence. (eg. very scant information, often no flag)
    • 2: Basic insignia in existence. (eg. flag, coat of arms, little detailed information)
    • 3: Some culture in existence (eg. a cuisine or national dish)
    • 4: A basic culture in existence (eg. a cuisine and a religion)
    • 5: A strong culture in existence (many aspects covered, eg. cuisine, religion, language, sport etc.)
  • Negative perception
    • 0: Nation is criticised by everyone or almost everyone and has only or mostly negative relations.
    • 1: Nation is criticised or has negative relations with more than 7 nations.
    • 2: Nation '' '' '' '' '' '' '' more than 5 and up to and including 7 nations.
    • 3: Nation '' '' '' '' '' '' '' more than 2 and '' '' '' '' 5 nations.
    • 4: Nation '' '' '' '' '' '' '' up to and including 2 nations.
    • 5: Nation is not criticised and has only positive relations.
  • Budget
    • 0: Apart from the head of government's internet connection, nothing is spent to further the nation.
    • 1: Less than $50 USD spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes its head of government's internet connection and web hosting costs.
    • 2: Less than $100 USD '' '' '' '' '' '' ''. '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' ''.
    • 3: Less than $150 USD '' '' '' '' '' '' ''. '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' ''.
    • 4: Less than $200 USD '' '' '' '' '' '' ''. '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' '' ''.
    • 5: More than $200 USD '' '' '' '' '' '' ''. This may or may not include its head of government's internet connection and web hosting costs.
  • Development
    • 0: Has nothing more than the bare necessities (an old computer with freeware software)
    • 1: Has basic amenities like a fairly new computer with modern, commercial software.
    • 2: Has slightly more advanced amenities like the above, a currency and optionally a website.
    • 3: Has average amenities like the above, a few service-oriented businesses and optionally a forum.
    • 4: Has good amenities like the above, a self-made building, monument or such and one or more production-oriented businesses.
    • 5: Has excellent amenities like the above, some transport, a good, content-rich, well-designed website, and optionally primary industry.

Level calculation

Finally, once all these are determined, one calculates the level of a specific micronation by taking the average of all the scores. If a factor is unknown, a guess can be made or it may be left out. Here is an example:

Thus, Petorio's level would be 2.8. Here is what the levels mean:

  • 1-1.4: This... ...whatever it is does not deserve the term "micronation".
  • 1.5-1.9: If it is a very young micronation, it may yet prosper; if it is older (four months upwards), it is relatively insignificant, but not necessarily to be ignored. Many older ones are in a temporary period of inactivity, but may ascend to a level 3.0-3.9 micronation eventually.
  • 2.0-3.0: A very average micronation, they exist en masse. No need to ignore them, but they probably aren't very special or interesting. Often it is hard to tell the difference between them, and if they stay at this level for a long time it is probably because of a lack of population, time, effort, and/or interest.
  • 3.1-4.9: One of the most significant micronations (eg. St.Charlie, the Nemkhav Federation etc). There was a lot of effort involved in getting the micronation to this level. Once here, it is quite difficult for the nation to fall back down unless it becomes inactive, like Petorio.
  • 5.0: What some describe as a micronational superpower; this would be something like Sealand, Molossia, etc.

Matthew's Democracy System of classification

  • Political parties
    • 0: 1 political party
    • 1: 5 or less
    • 2: 15 or less
    • 3: 30 or less
    • 4: 54 or less
    • 5: 55 or more
  • Freedom of speech
    • 0: None at all
    • 1: Hardly any freedom of speech
    • 2: Little freedom of speech
    • 3: Moderate freedom of speech
    • 4: Freedom of speech, no hate speech, however
    • 5: You can say what you please
  • How people see the leader
    • 0: He is a god
    • 1: He is not a god but he is a demigod
    • 2: Not demigod, but he can't be questioned
    • 3: You can question a little bit but not much
    • 4: You can question him most of the time
    • 5: He is not perfect at all, correct him in his mistakes
  • Treatment of minorities (Religious and ethnic minorities)
    • 0: Final Solution policy in place.
    • 1: Not killed but denied their basic freedoms.
    • 2: Only certain minority even get somewhat good treatment.
    • 3: Treat all of them with tolerance, but just that
    • 4: Strong treatment of minorities expect for a few religions that are a threat to public safety
    • 5: NO minority is left out

Source grading

  • 0: No democracy, no human rights at all.
  • 1.00-1.99: A little but don't get your hopes up if you want to criticize the leader or oligarchy.
  • 2.00-2.99: Needs a lot of work but don't give up hope yet.
  • 3.00-3.99: Fair democracy, needs some improvement
  • 4.00-4.99: Fair democracy
  • 5.00: Anarchy

Examples

Burkland 1+4+5+4=14 14/4=3.50

St.Charlie 2+4+5+4= 15/4=3.75

Kuhugstan 1+5+5+4=15 15/4=3.75

Empire of Austenasia N/A+4+3+5=12 12/3=4.0[1]

The Milic definition of statehood

Overview

The Milic definition of statehood, created by Miles Bradley Huff on 5 November 2014, is a hybrid system of state definition, combining both constitutive and declarative definitions of states. It is presented as a list of items accompanied by check-boxes, which are used in the evaluation of an entity's statehood. There are two general categories, each headed by 'government' (optionally presented in a three-category representation, as it is below, but to the same end).

Criteria

  • The base requirement
    • Has a functional government
  • The sovereignty track
    • Has a domicile population
    • Exercises de facto sovereignty over its domicile population
  • The diplomacy track
    • Has the capacity to participate fully in international relations
    • Is recognized by a member of the United Nations, or is a member of the United Nations.

Evaluation

  • Fulfills no criteria: Non-state entity
  • Fulfills only governmental criteria: Organization
  • Fulfills any criteria in the sovereignty track: Community
  • Fulfills any criteria in the diplomatic track: Internationalism
  • Fulfills all criteria: Full-blooded state

If several of these evaluations can apply to a single entity, the terms are mixed. 'Organization' is changed to 'state-like', and the others remain lexically the same. An entity that fulfills the government criteria as well as any of the sovereignty requirements is a "state-like community"; likewise, an entity that fulfills the government criteria as well as any of the diplomatic criteria would be a "state-like internationalism"; and lastly, an entity that fulfills criteria in all categories, but which does not fulfill every single criteria, is an "internationalized state-like community". An entity must have a check in all possible boxes to be considered a full-blooded state. A 'micronation', then, is defined as an entity that that meets some, but not all, of these requirements (including the 'government' one, and at least one other); a microstate as an entity that meets all of them, but is territorially tiny; and a macronation as an entity of reasonable territorial size that meets all of these conditions.
These definitions do not expressly require an entity to have physical territory, so long as it has domicile citizens, ie citizens living in territory (physical or otherwise) controlled by the entity.

Stùrd's Liberal System of Micronational Classification

Stùrd's Liberal System of Micronational Classification was created by Netwafekzră Vrokă (formerly known as Bin Stùrd). It draws from many of the other Systems mentioned in this article, but provides a much broader image when scoring.

Popularity

Influence
  • 0: The nation is Completely Unknown.
  • 1: Not known outside an extremely limited area online.
  • 2: Somewhat unknown or widely ignored
  • 3: Known by some micronations, but not really popular.
  • 4: Known inside the micronational community but not seen as the most successful or popular micronation.
  • 5: Known by people and throughout the micronational Internet.
Allies

An “ally” in the broadest sense is any nation that you establish relations with. However, this system uses a more strict definition, where an “Alliance” is Purely Diplomatic, and must have full trade, military, and other relations with your nation.

  • 0: 0 allies
  • 1: 2 allies or less
  • 2: 5 allies or less
  • 3: 10 allies or less
  • 4: 20 allies or less
  • 5: 21 allies upwards

Government

Political parties
  • 0: 0 Political Parties
  • 1: 1 political party
  • 2: 5 or less
  • 3: 15 or less
  • 4: 30 or less
  • 5: 30 or more

Human Rights

Freedom of speech
  • 0: None at all
  • 1: Hardly any freedom of speech
  • 2: Little freedom of speech
  • 3: Moderate freedom of speech
  • 4: Freedom of speech, no hate speech, however
  • 5: You can say what you please
How people see the leader
  • 0: They are Worshiped and Feared as a Supreme Being.
  • 1: They are feared as an Unquestionable Authority.
  • 2: They can't be questioned.
  • 3: You can question a little bit but not much
  • 4: You can question them most of the time
  • 5: They are not perfect at all, and can be corrected on their mistakes.
Treatment of Minorities
  • 0: Final Solution policy in place.
  • 1: Not killed but denied their basic freedoms.
  • 2: Only certain minority even get somewhat good treatment.
  • 3: Treat all of them with tolerance, but just that
  • 4: Strong treatment of minorities expect for a few religions that are a threat to public safety
  • 5: NO minority is left out

Culture

Culture
  • 0: No unique culture in existence.
  • 1: Hardly any culture in existence. (eg. very scant information, often no flag)
  • 2: Basic insignia in existence. (eg. flag, coat of arms, little detailed information)
  • 3: Some culture in existence (eg. a cuisine or national dish)
  • 4: A basic culture in existence (eg. a cuisine and a religion)
  • 5: A strong culture in existence (many aspects covered, eg. cuisine, religion, language, sport etc.)

Money and Resources

Resources

This section counts things such as lumber, wool, and iron, among others. The micronation in question must have a means by which to extract/process these resources in order for them to count. For example, a micronation which sits on a gold mine but which hasn't the capability to mine that gold should not count gold for this section. Similarly, a micronation that has sewing facilities but no thread should not count their sewing machine. It should also be noted that land itself does not count for this section, as it is a prerequisite for statehood under the Montevideo Convention, which makes it a null-point in comparing most micronations. In the event of a micronation with no claimed land, subtract one from this section. Also, if the micronation in question has land but does not have the ability to produce food, subtract 1 from this section's score.

  • 0: Zero usable resources
  • 1: One usable resource
  • 2: Two usable resources
  • 3: Three usable resources
  • 4: Four usable resources
  • 5: Six or more usable resources
Budget
  • 0: $0
  • 1: Less than $100 USD spent yearly on the micronation in question. This includes its head of government's Internet connection and web hosting costs.
  • 2: Less than $250 USD.
  • 3: Less than $500 USD.
  • 4: Less than $1,000 USD.
  • 5: More than $5,000 USD. This may or may not include its head of government's Internet connection and web hosting costs.

Scores

Calculation
  • Popularity = Influence + Allies/2 = ___ (ex. Huro-Atlantica:4+5/2 =4.5)
  • Government = ___
  • Human Rights = Speech + Leader + Minorities/3 = ___ (ex. Huro-Atlantica: 5+5+5/3 = 5)
  • Culture = ___
  • Money and Resources = Resources + Budget/2 = ___
  • Overall Potential = Popularity + Government + Human Rights + Culture + Money and Resources/5 =___/5 (ex. Huro-Atlantica: 4.5+2+5+5+5/5 = 4.3 ; Rikuchar: 1+2+4.7+5+0/5 = 2.54)
Significance
  • 0-0.9: Unknown and No structure whatsoever.
  • 1-1.9: Overlooked and Not very well structured nation
  • 2-2.9: Some structure, but still needs work to become a good nation. Is known by a few other people.
  • 3-3.9: Somewhat Good Structure, still needs some tweaking to finalize the nation. Is known by a good number of people.
  • 4-4.5: Very Good Structure, Is known by many micronationalists in their local community.
  • 4.6-5:Excellent Structure, Is known worldwide by micronationalists.

Usian Bureaucratic Scale

The Usian Bureaucratic Scale (or Measurement) is a system developed by the National Statistics Office (NSO) of the Republic of USI on 8 September 2014. It is to be updated on a weekly basis, with more categories added to improve scale. To calculate the bureaucracy for a micronation, one must score one's micronation according to the guidelines and average all five categories. The "optimal" amount of bureaucracy for an average person would be 3-4, though of course what one makes of the result is subjective. The "highest" score is 8, and the lowest score is 1.

Criteria

Number of cabinet-level departments
  • 1 point: 0-2 cabinet-level departments
  • 2 points: 3-4 cabinet-level departments
  • 3 points: 5-6 cabinet-level departments
  • 4 points: 7-8 cabinet-level departments
  • 5 points: 9-10 cabinet-level departments
  • 6 points: 11-12 cabinet-level departments
  • 7 points: 13-14 cabinet-level departments
  • 8 points: 15 or more cabinet-level departments
Number of documents issued for citizenship

(2 points, 4 points and 6 points omitted)

  • 1 point: No documents
  • 3 points: 1 document (e.g. Passport)
  • 5 points: 2 documents (e.g. Passport and ID card)
  • 7 points: 3 documents (e.g. Passport, ID card and paper)
  • 8 points: 4 or more documents
Average number of sub-cabinet-level departments per cabinet-level department
  • 1 point: None
  • 2 points: 1 sub-cabinet level department
  • 3 points: 2 sub-cabinet level departments
  • 4 points: 3 sub-cabinet level departments
  • 5 points: 4 sub-cabinet level departments
  • 6 points: 5-6 sub-cabinet level departments
  • 7 points: 7 sub-cabinet level departments
  • 8 points: 8 or more sub-cabinet level departments
Time period for the legislature to make a law
  • 1 point: Less than a day
  • 2 points: 1-3 days
  • 3 points: 4-6 days
  • 4 points: A week
  • 5 points: 8-10 days
  • 6 points: 11-12 days
  • 7 points: 13-14 days
  • 8 points: More than two weeks
Number of offices per member of government
  • 1 point: No one except a dictator (or the like) holds an office
  • 2 points: Different people hold an office every day
  • 3 points: Everyone holds one office, but there isn't much distinction between one office and another
  • 4 points: One office
  • 5 points: 2-3 offices
  • 6 points: 4-5 offices
  • 7 points: 6-7 offices
  • 8 points: 8 or more offices

Scores

To calculate the final score, one must add all points and divide by five (number of categories). Example: Usian Republic: 8 points + 7 points + 8 points + 7 points + 8 points divided by 5 = 7.4

  • 1-1.9 points: Unstructured or dictatorial government
  • 2-2.9 points: Needs more structure, even for a micronation
  • 3-3.9 points: Probably ideal for an average micronation
  • 4-4.9 points: Perhaps for a more populous micronation
  • 5-5.9 points: Whoever developed this micronation is a bit of a bureaucrat
  • 6-6.9 points: It has to be a very large micronation indeed for this to be an ideal system
  • 7-7.9 points: Competition for the U.S. and Germany
  • 8 points: This government system was obviously designed by a Vogon.

References and notes

  1. Austenasia has no political parties - all those who run for election do so independently.