Prime Minister of Baustralia

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Prime Minister of Baustralia
Royal coat of arms of Baustralia (Variant 2).svg
Oliver Doig, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg
Incumbent
Sir Oliver Doig

since 12 December 2022
His Royal Government
StyleThe Right Honourable (formal)
His Excellency (diplomatic)
Term lengthAt His Majesty's Pleasure, usually a year
Inaugural holderSir John Timpson
DeputyDeputy Prime Minister

The Prime Minister of Baustralia (informally abbreviated to PM) is the head of government of Baustralia. The Prime Minister directs both the executive and the legislature, and together with their Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior ministers, most of whom are government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Monarch, to Parliament, to their political party and ultimately to the electorate. The office of Prime Minister is one of the Great Offices of State. The Prime Minister is ex officio also Lord High Treasurer. The current holder of the office, Sir Oliver Doig, leader of the Conservative Party, was appointed by the King on 12 December 2022.

Authority

The Prime Minister is the chair of the Cabinet (the Executive) and is the Head of His Royal Government. The Prime Minister also commands the political party in power, usually holding a majority in the House of Commons, Baustralia's lower house in the legislature. The Prime Minister acts as the voice for the government, and in some cases for His Majesty, both at home and out-of-country. Also as head of the executive, the Prime Minister dismisses and appoints all cabinet members, as well as organizes policies and activities to enact the legislative agenda of the party.

Foundation

The position of Prime Minister was never formed officially, referenced only once in the current constitution when the Dukedom of Cascadia was formed making the first Prime Minister a duke. Therefore, the office of the Prime Minister is founded on custom solely. Similarly, the office of Prime Minister was never formed in the first constitution with the only reference being that the Prime Minister must say an oath of office.

Infancy

The current state of the office of Prime Minister is considered by Baustralian historians as in its infancy where the office is uncodified and based on custom alone. No bill has ever been produced laying out the office of the Prime Minister. It was formed on request of the King on 2 July 2017 when the duties of Baustralia became too great for him alone with other responsibilities, electing to form a Parliament with ministers.

The office was referenced later in the Fixed Terms Election Act, changing the terms from a four-year term to a one-year term by convention. The Prime Minister's term is still at His Majesty's Pleasure. The Prime Minister can also not serve for more than four consecutive terms, however, as before it is by convention and not by law.

Deputy Prime Minister

The Deputy Prime Minister of Baustralia (informally abbreviated to DPM) is a senior member of the Cabinet of Baustralia. The current holder of the office, Brianna Broersma, was appointed by the Prime Minister on 12 December 2022. The DPM does not, unlike the Vice President of the United States or similar offices, assume the duties and responsibilities of the Prime Minister but rather deputizes at events or functions. The position may also be used to give seniority to a cabinet member.

There have been seven Deputy Prime Ministers of Baustralia, Sir Harrison Pickles under the first, second and third Timpson ministries, Emily Day under the McGrath ministry, Sir John Timpson under the Sullivan ministries, and Oliver Doig and James Gardner under the Parker ministry, Jack Morris, 1st Viscount of Englewood under the Burgardt ministry, and Brianna Broersma under the Doig ministry.

The Deputy Prime Minister under Sir Charles Burgardt was Jack Morris, 1st Viscount of Englewood as leader of the Libertarian Party, which with the Liberal Party formed a coalition. Upon its breakup, all members joined the liberal party to keep them in power, and Lord Englewood was appointed Lord Speaker. No deputy prime minister was appointed throughout the rest of the term.

Prime Ministers of Baustralia

No. Portrait Arms Name[1]
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Length of term Party Sovereign
(Reign)
Deputy
1 Sir John Timpson, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg Arms of John Timpson.svg The Right Honourable
Sir John Timpson

MP for Holderton
(born 2003)
2 July
2017
22 September
2019
813 days Conservative John
Royal coat of arms of Baustralia.svg
(2017–present)
Sir Harrison Pickles
2 Aidan McGrath, 2020 pattern official photo.jpg Coat of arms of Aidan McGrath (2022).svg The Right Honourable
Aidan McGrath

MP for McNevin
(born 2003)
22 September
2019
7 October
2019
16 days Worker's Lady Emily Day
(1) Sir John Timpson, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg Arms of John Timpson.svg The Right Honourable
Sir John Timpson

MP for Holderton
(born 2003)
7 October
2019
6 April
2020
183 days Conservative Sir Harrison Pickles
3 Nick Sullivan, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg Arms of Nick Sullivan.svg The Right Honourable
Sir Nick Sullivan

MP for Mild Pond
(born 2004)
6 April
2020
27 June
2021
448 days Sir John Timpson
4 Ella Parker, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg Coat of arms of Lady Ella Parker.svg The Right Honourable
Lady Ella Parker

MP for Atlas
(born 2004)
27 June
2021
1 July
2022
370 days Sir Oliver Doig
Sir James Gardner
5 Charles Burgardt, 2020 pattern government photo.jpg Coat of arms of Charles Burgardt.svg The Right Honourable
Sir Charles Burgardt

MP for Seamanhattan
(born 2002)
1 July
2022
12 December
2022
165 days Liberal The Viscount Englewood
Vacancy
6 Oliver Doig, 2020 pattern naval photo.jpg Coat of arms of Oliver Doig.svg The Right Honourable
Sir Oliver Doig

MP for McNevin
(born 2003)
12 December
2022
Incumbent 55 days Conservative Brianna Broersma

Timeline

Below is a timeline of Prime Ministers of Baustralia, and their deputies.

Harrison Pickles, 1st Viscount of WoolerJohn TimpsonOliver DoigCharles BurgardtElla ParkerNick SullivanAidan McGrath
  1. Including honorifics and constituencies for elected MPs.