Drill of the Baustralian Armed Forces

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Drill of the Baustralian Armed Forces is ceremonial calls given during a parade or during routine training. These movements are based on the Canadian Armed Forces Manual of Drill and Ceremonial.

Military drill originated with the tradition of close-order formation combat, to increase effectiveness. This was used by the Romans, and after the fall of the empire, drill eclipsed. By the fourteenth century, drill resurfaced and was spread throughout countries. It is now used to teach members how to move and work as a team.

Directions

The four directions used by the BAF are:

  1. Advance
  2. Retire
  3. Left
  4. Right

The advance is usually to the front of the parade square, towards the flags and dias, or toward the ship's bow. If not on a parade square, it is the direction that the group fell in toward.

The retire is defined as the opposite direction of Advance.

The left and right are defined as the respective direction 90° to the advance.

Should a group not on a parade square right dress, the advance shall be changed to that direction.

Squad drill at the halt, without arms

Attention
The position of attention is the most common parade position. This is the most alert position, and allows the most position change ability.
The member shall be standing erect, with the heels together, and feet at a 30° angle.
The hands are held in tight fists with the thumbs aligned with the seam of the trousers.
The command is [UNIT], ATTEN–SHUN
The navy may opt to use the command [UNIT], HO
For an illustrated reference, see figure 1
Stand at ease
The position of ease is a parade position used to allow the troops to be in a comfortable position, while still being rigid and alert.
The member shall be standing erect with the heels shoulder-width apart, while feet still at a 30° angle.
The hands shall be folded together behind the member with the left hand over the right hand, and arms extended all the way.
The command is [UNIT], STAND AT – EASE
For an illustrated reference, see figure 2
Stand easy
The position of easy is a parade position used to allow the troops to rest, fix themselves, and stretch.
The member shall be standing relaxed with the heels shoulder-width apart, while feet still at a 30° angle.
The hands shall be placed as if the position of attention, however, the fists don't need to be tight.
The member may speak, and smoke if not in the public eye.
The command is [UNIT], STAND – EASY
For an illustrated reference, see figure 3
Remove headdress
The command remove headdress is used during prayers, cheers, and religious parades.
Female members are not required to remove their headdress, except in the case of cheers.
The command is [UNIT], REMOVE – HEADDRESS
The navy may opt to use the command [UNIT], OFF – CAPS
For an illustrated reference, see figures 4.1, and 4.2
Movement one
On the command [UNIT] WILL REMOVE HEADDRESS BY NUMBERS, [UNIT] – ONE
The member shall raise the right arm and grip the headdress with the fingers gripping the top of the cap, and the thumb gripping the bottom.
Movement two
On the command [UNIT] WILL REMOVE HEADDRESS BY NUMBERS, [UNIT] – TWO
The member shall cut the right arm to the chest, with the elbow bent on the side.
Saluting, at the halt, without arms
The command salute is used to address officers, or colours.
The command is [UNIT], TO THE [FRONT/RIGHT/LEFT] – SALUTE
For an illustrated reference, see figure 5
Movement one
On the command [UNIT], TO THE [FRONT/RIGHT/LEFT], SALUTE BY NUMBERS, [UNIT] – ONE
The member shall raise the right arm with the palm facing the officer (or away if navy), with the elbow parallel to the parade square.
Movement two
On the command [UNIT], TO THE [FRONT/RIGHT/LEFT], SALUTE BY NUMBERS, [UNIT] – TWO
The member shall cut the right arm back to the position of attention.

Figures

Figure 1 (Attention) Figure 2 (Stand at Ease) Figure 3 (Stand Easy) Figure 4.1 (Remove Headdress, movement 1) Figure 4.2 (Remove Headdress, movement 2) Figure 4.1 (Salute at the halt without arms)
Figure 1
Attention
Figure 2
Stand at Ease
Figure 3
Stand Easy
Figure 4.1
Remove Headdress, movement 1
Figure 4.2
Remove Headdress, movement 2
Figure 5
Salute, at the halt, without arms